Legs by Layne Services

Legs by Layne Services

Peripheral Vascular Disease

Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is a blood circulation disorder that causes the blood vessels outside of your heart and brain to narrow, block, or spasm. This can happen in your arteries or veins. PVD typically causes pain and fatigue, often in your legs, and especially during exercise. The pain usually improves with rest.

Venous Disease

If you have CVI, valves in your veins (usually in the leg or sometimes the arms) don't work, causing blood to pool in your legs and putting increased pressure on the walls of the veins.  May be due to valve dysfunction (usually hereditary) or due to valve destruction after a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or blood clot.

Hyperhidrosis

Hyperhidrosis, or excessive sweating, is a common disorder which produces a lot of unhappiness. An estimated 2%-3% of Americans suffer from excessive sweating of the underarms (axillary hyperhidrosis) or of the palms and soles of the feet (palmoplantar hyperhidrosis). Underarm problems tend to start in late adolescence, while palm and sole sweating often begins earlier, around age 13 (on the average). Untreated, these problems may continue throughout life.  

Sweating is embarrassing, it stains clothes, ruins romance, and complicates business and social interactions. Severe cases can have serious practical consequences as well, making it hard for people who suffer from it to hold a pen, grip a car steering wheel, or shake hands.

Swollen Legs

Leg swelling caused by the retention of fluid in leg tissues is known as peripheral edema. It can be caused by a problem with the circulatory system, the lymphatic system or the kidneys. You may also experience swelling due to fluid buildup after sitting or standing for a long time.

Varicose Veins

Varicose veins usually announce themselves as bulging, bluish cords running just beneath the surface of your skin. They almost always affect legs and feet. Visible swollen and twisted veins -- sometimes surrounded by patches of flooded capillaries known as spider veins -- are considered superficial varicose veins. Although they can be painful and disfiguring, they are usually harmless. When inflamed, they become tender to the touch and can hinder circulation to the point of causing swollen ankles, itchy skin, and aching in the affected limb.

Carotid Artery Disease

Carotid artery disease is a disease in which a waxy substance called plaque builds up inside the carotid arteries. You have two common carotid arteries, one on each side of your neck. They each divide into internal and external carotid arteries.  The internal carotid arteries supply oxygen-rich blood to your brain. The external carotid arteries supply oxygen-rich blood to your face, scalp, and neck.

Lymphedema

Lymphedema refers to swelling that generally occurs in one of your arms or legs. Sometimes both arms or both legs swell.  Lymphedema is most commonly caused by the removal of or damage to your lymph nodes as a part of cancer treatment. It results from a blockage in your lymphatic system, which is part of your immune system. The blockage prevents lymph fluid from draining well, and the fluid buildup leads to swelling.  There's no cure for lymphedema. But it can be managed with early diagnosis and diligent care of your affected limb.

Spider Veins

Spider veins are a group of dilated veins that appear close to the surface of the skin and look like spider webs or tree branches. They are usually red or blue. Although they can develop anywhere, they are most common on the legs and face. Spider veins are smaller than varicose veins, but they are sometimes located together. Varicose veins are swollen veins that have filled with pooled blood. 

Spider veins and varicose veins are very common, especially in people over the age of 50. Often, these abnormal veins cause no symptoms, but they can sometimes trigger swelling, throbbing, and restless legs. In some cases, they may become painful or cause skin sores or blood clots. Treatments for spider veins are generally safe and effective.

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

The aorta is the largest blood vessel in the human body. It carries blood from your heart down to your abdomen, legs, and pelvis. The walls of the aorta can swell or bulge out like a small balloon if they become weak. This is called an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) when it happens in the part of the aorta that’s in your abdomen.

AAAs don’t always cause problems, but a ruptured aneurysm can be life-threatening. Therefore, if you’re diagnosed with an aneurysm, your doctor will probably want to monitor you closely, even if they don’t intervene right away.

Chronic Open Wounds

A wound is considered to chronic when it does not heal in the expected time frame consistent with the type of wound. Treating wounds is critical, as improper or lack of wound care can result in amputation or even death. Wound care is an enormous health problem impacting our health care system, and people with chronic wounds must often choose between meeting their work obligations or treating their wounds. Since chronic wounds are usually caused by inadequate blood supply to the wound site, as vascular specialist should be your first choice for care and treatment.

Typically, wounds fail to heal from lack of oxygen and nutrients supplied by the circulation of blood to the affected area, or from infection. Pressure wounds, such as bedsores, must be treated by first removing the cause of pressure resulting in lack of blood flow. Varicose veins can cause ulceration due to lack of blood flow through damaged valves.  It is important to know that when one considers something as seemingly simple as varicose vein treatment, for reasons of the fact that varicose veins can be indicative of a larger problem, a vascular surgeon should be your first choice. Ischema, or lack of blood circulation (as with diabetes patients), is also a major cause of chronic wounds.

Chronic DVTs

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurs when a blood clot (thrombus) forms in one or more of the deep veins in your body, usually in your legs. Deep vein thrombosis can cause leg pain or swelling, but may occur without any symptoms.

Deep vein thrombosis can develop if you have certain medical conditions that affect how your blood clots. Deep vein thrombosis can also happen if you don't move for a long time, such as after surgery, following an accident, or when you are confined to a hospital or nursing home bed.

Deep vein thrombosis is a serious condition because blood clots in your veins can break loose, travel through your bloodstream and lodge in your lungs, blocking blood flow (pulmonary embolism).

TOS (Thoracic Outlet Syndrome)

Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a condition whereby symptoms are produced (such as numbness in fingers, pain in shoulder, arm, and neck) due to compression of nerves and/or blood vessels in the upper chest. The passageway for these nerves and blood vessels to exit the chest and supply the upper extremities is referred to as the thoracic outlet. Muscle, bone, and other tissues border the thoracic outlet. Any condition that results in enlargement or movement of these tissues of or near the thoracic outlet can cause the thoracic outlet syndrome. These conditions include muscle enlargement (such as from weight lifting), injuries, an extra rib extending from the neck (cervical rib), weight gain, and rare tumors at the top of the lung. Often no specific cause is detectable.